Tagged: places

Multicolored Martian Landscape? Nope. Fly Geyser in the Nevada Desert

March 30th, 2011 Permalink

Mother Nature didn’t create this bizarre geothermal wonder located in the Nevada desert, but neither did aliens. The vividly multicolored Fly Geyser phenomena is the result of an accident by man. Since the 1960s, the volcano-shaped Fly Geyser has continuously spewed hot water, as if morphing the land and environment into its own ecosystem and desert habitat.

Fly Geyser Timed Exposure

Mother Nature didn’t create this geothermal wonder, but neither did aliens. In 1916, a rancher drilled a well in hopes of turning the desert into a fertile wetland, but accidentally hit a geothermal pocket of water. It wasn’t until 1964 that boiling water started to escape to the surface and that is how this geothermal wonder came to be. It’s located on private property, the Fly Ranch. This phenomena has been named Fly Geyser in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, located about 20 miles north of Gerlach. Photo #1 by wallpaperpimper

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In Memory of Polar Bear Superstar Knut (30 Pic Tribute)

March 25th, 2011 Permalink

When the polar bear cub Knut was rejected by his mother, Berlin zoo keeper Thomas Doerflein took over his care. Knut was an adorable white and fluffy baby which soon skyrocketed Knut to fame. Knut became a superstar polar bear and had a very special relationship with Doerflein. Yet recently Knut was found dead at the Berlin Zoo. He was only a little over 4 years old. Here is a 30 picture tribute in memory to a one-of-a-kind superstar polar bear. R.I.P. Knut.

Berlin zoo employee Thomas Doerflein plays with polar bear cub Knut

This is baby Knut, the polar bear that was rejected by its mother Tosca after Knut was born on December 5, 2006. He weighed only 19 pounds (9 kilograms). Berlin zoo employee Thomas Doerflein plays with polar bear cub Knut in this picture. Knut had to be reared by hand and bottle-fed by Doerflein at the Berlin Zoo in Germany. They had a very special bond that is almost never seen between human and polar bear. Photo #1 by Jeremy C. Munns

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21 Stunning & Superbly Serene Chinese Gardens

March 4th, 2011 Permalink

China has population of around 1,331,460,000 people, but for such a crowded place, it offers many gorgeous and peaceful gardens. There is nothing left to chance in the design of Chinese gardens. They are meant to reflect a painting or a poem, to be a place of spiritual utopia to connect with nature and a person’s inner heart. Chinese gardens are socially and culturally important. They serve multiple purposes as an extension of the house, used for retreat, for festivity, for study of poetry, and for romance. Looking at the pictures, we feel peaceful. So relax and take a virtual tour through a few stunning and superbly serene Chinese gardens. We love these pics! [21 pictures]

Hupao (Dreaming of the Tiger) Spring in Hangzhou, China

“Dreaming of the Tiger” – Hupao Spring in Hangzhou, China. Chinese gardens are built not planted to be a solitary place or to be a place for “social contemplation of nature.” Chinese gardens are culturally important, serving as a semi-public extension of the house, meant for retreat, for festivity, for study of poetry, or even for romance. Photo #1 by Sh1019

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Petra: “Rose-Red City Half As Old As Time” (22 pics)

March 2nd, 2011 Permalink

Petra, “a rose-red city half as old as time,” is one of the world’s most famous rock-cut architectural sites. It was half-built, half-carved into the rocks and is surrounded by mountains dotted with passages and gorges. This ancient fortress is now in ruins and reportedly haunted with centuries worth of ghosts. Petra, Jordan, is situated between the Red Sea and the Dead Sea, and inhabited since prehistoric times. In 1985, UNESCO designated Petra as a World Heritage Site. Petra is definitely on our bucketlist. We love these pics! [22 Photos]

Petra by Candlelight

Petra, Jordan, by Candlelight. If the gorgeous rock colors are dazzling during the day, imagine more than 1,500 candles flickering in the ancient city, through the Siq to the Treasury where Bedouin music is playing. Photo #1 by Paul Stocker

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Mystical, Magical & Magnificent Monasteries in Meteora (20 Pics)

February 23rd, 2011 Permalink

In Meteora, Greece, six magnificent monasteries still exist, precariously perched atop 1,300 feet high sandstone pinnacles. Hermit monks constructed the first monastery before nuns came to build too. Access to each monastery was crazy, a leap of faith, climbing rocks, and ladders lashed together or large nets until the ropes would break. The bizarre but beautiful monasteries of Meteora are centuries old and isted by UNESCO World Heritage. We love these 20 pics of Meteora.

Meteora Greece

The caves in Meteora, Greece, had inhabitants for fifty millennia, but due to raids, “hermit monks” moved to the safety of sandstone rock pinnacles in the 9th century and began building monasteries. More monks and nuns came, building more monasteries perched high upon the cliffs. Wikipedia reports, “Access to the monasteries was originally (and deliberately) difficult, requiring either long ladders lashed together or large nets used to haul up both goods and people. This required quite a leap of faith — the ropes were replaced, so the story goes, only ‘when the Lord let them break.'” UNESCO World Heritage says, “The net in which intrepid pilgrims were hoisted up vertically alongside the 1,224 ft. cliff where the Varlaam monastery dominates the valley symbolizes the fragility of a traditional way of life that is threatened with extinction.” Photo #1 by Vaggelis Vlahos

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17 Tremendous Terraced Rice Fields

February 17th, 2011 Permalink

Like rice? Rice is a staple in many countries. Terraced paddy fields are very common in rice farming where the land is hilly or mountainous.
Terraced rice fields helps to decrease erosion and work well for rice crops which need to be grown in a flooded area. Terraced paddy fields are built into steep hillsides by intense physical labor, sometimes by using a water buffalo to help in the wetlands. While terraced rice fields are a common sight in third-world countries, it is an uncommon sight for many of us. We loved these pics – 17 Tremendous Terraced Rice Fields.

Terrace rice fields in Yunnan Province, China

Terrace rice fields in Yunnan Province, China. Photo #1 by Jialiang Gao

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The Champagne Pool = New Zealand’s Stunning Geothermal Wai-O-Tapu Wonderland

February 12th, 2011 Permalink

This geothermal pool, called The Champagne Pool in New Zealand is lovely, perhaps romantic? The water bubbles much like a bubbly glass of champagne from which it gets its name. But before you take a dip, you might like to know it’s hot — over 160 °F and the colors, well . . . some of them come from arsenic and sulfide deposits. It was formed by a hydrothermal eruption 900 years ago. It’s in a crater with a diameter of about 213 feet; the geothermal pool is 230 feet deep. These sacred waters are the most colorful geothermal area in the New Zealand. It’s known as the Champagne Pool at the Artist’s Palette at the Wai-o-tapu Thermal Wonderland. We love these pics!

Famous geothermal pool Waiotapu, New Zealand - The Champagne Pool

Famous geothermal pool Waiotapu, New Zealand – The Champagne Pool. Photo #1 by Christopher Schoenbohm

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12 Gorgeous Sites to See in Australia

February 11th, 2011 Permalink

Australia – Wow! It’s gorgeous. It’s also been hit with more than its share of adverse weather recently. We would still love to go visit Down Under. It’s a nature lover’s paradise. We love these pics!

Admiral's Arch - Kangaroo Island, South Australia - Flinders Chase National Park

Admiral’s Arch – Kangaroo Island, South Australia – Flinders Chase National Park. Photo #1 by `◄ccdoh1►

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Double Rainbow Over Castle Geyser

Steam phase eruption of Castle Geyser shows a double rainbow at Yellowstone National Park. Photo by Mila Zinkova