Category: phenomena

Erupting Volcanic Paradise: Lava Rivers & Spatter Fountains of Hawaii [48 PICS]

July 30th, 2011 Permalink

Volcanic activity is spiking in Hawaii and people are flocking there to see the spectacular show. Visitors, both regular folks and scientists, to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park are able to witness the active volcanic personality and the formation of new cinder cones, glowing pit craters, rivers of lava and fountains of spatter. This volcanic paradise shows off 70 million years of volcanism, but was only established as a National Park in 1916. It stretches over 333,086 acres (505.36 square miles) and has two active volcanoes. While Kīlauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes and has been in nearly continuous eruption since 1983, Mauna Loa is the world’s most massive volcano. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park has seven ecological zones, was designated an International Biosphere Reserve in 1980 and became a World Heritage Site in 1987. Welcome to the Big Island and volcanic paradise! We love these pics! [48 Photos]

Lava erupting from the Pu`u `O`o vent

View at dusk of the young Pu’u ‘O’o cinder-and-spatter cone. The fantastic fountain on Kilauea, Hawaii, is shooting up about 40 m high. Photo #1 by G.E. Ulrich/USGS

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Marvel at the Magnificent Marble Caves [35 PICS]

June 28th, 2011 Permalink

In Patagonia, South America, General Carrera Lake is shared by Argentina and Chile. But on the Chilean side of the beautiful emerald-green to turquoise-blue waters, there are breathtakingly beautiful marble caves carved into passageways and caverns. These amazing marble formations were sculpted by erosion into three main marble formations: La Capilla (the Chapel), El Catedral (the Cathedral), and La Cueva (the Cave). The impressive labyrinth of marble caves are large enough for a small boat to glide into. Here are those magnificent marble caves. [35 Photos]

Reserva Nacional Cavernas de Marmol - Lago General Carrera Cavernas de Marmol - Patagonia Chilena

Incredibly beauty to be found at the Marble Caverns on General Carrera Lake in Patagonia, Chile. Photo #1 by © Jorge Leon Cabello

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Multicolored Martian Landscape? Nope. Fly Geyser in the Nevada Desert

March 30th, 2011 Permalink

Mother Nature didn’t create this bizarre geothermal wonder located in the Nevada desert, but neither did aliens. The vividly multicolored Fly Geyser phenomena is the result of an accident by man. Since the 1960s, the volcano-shaped Fly Geyser has continuously spewed hot water, as if morphing the land and environment into its own ecosystem and desert habitat.

Fly Geyser Timed Exposure

Mother Nature didn’t create this geothermal wonder, but neither did aliens. In 1916, a rancher drilled a well in hopes of turning the desert into a fertile wetland, but accidentally hit a geothermal pocket of water. It wasn’t until 1964 that boiling water started to escape to the surface and that is how this geothermal wonder came to be. It’s located on private property, the Fly Ranch. This phenomena has been named Fly Geyser in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada, located about 20 miles north of Gerlach. Photo #1 by wallpaperpimper

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Live Dangerously & Ride the Lightning! [45 Wicked Pics]

March 18th, 2011 Permalink

Whammo! Zap! Strike! Yikes! Live Dangerously — Ride the Lightning! Spring is nearly here in the U.S. which means rain, but sometimes the rain doesn’t sweep in nice and gentle. Sometimes storms are wicked dangerous. One thing most all of us have in common worldwide is thunderstorms and the lightning that comes with those storms. The National Weather Service reports more than 3,000 deaths a year from lightning strikes, with 4-5 times many more people injured by lightning. Yet we are spellbound, staring at the awesome scary power of lightning. Some photographers are great at capturing that split second of nature’s zapping fury. Here are 45 wicked pics of lightning. We love these pics!

Lightning - Living Dangerously

Lightning – Living Dangerously. Photo #1 by TED

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24 Amazing Auroras: Aurora Borealis & Aurora Australis

February 17th, 2011 Permalink

We’ve collected 24 stunning auroras; either Auroras Borealis – the northern lights – or Aurora Australis – the southern lights. We love these pics!
[24 Photos]

Aurora Australis Over South Pole Telescope

Aurora Australis blankets the sky overhead of the 10-meter South Pole Telescope at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica. Like its more familiar counterpart, the Aurora Borealis, or Northern Lights, the Aurora Australis is caused by the solar wind passing through the upper atmosphere. But the Aurora Australis is much less frequently observed because so few people live in Antarctica during the austral winter. Photo #1 by Keith Vanderlinde, National Science Foundation

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The Champagne Pool = New Zealand’s Stunning Geothermal Wai-O-Tapu Wonderland

February 12th, 2011 Permalink

This geothermal pool, called The Champagne Pool in New Zealand is lovely, perhaps romantic? The water bubbles much like a bubbly glass of champagne from which it gets its name. But before you take a dip, you might like to know it’s hot — over 160 °F and the colors, well . . . some of them come from arsenic and sulfide deposits. It was formed by a hydrothermal eruption 900 years ago. It’s in a crater with a diameter of about 213 feet; the geothermal pool is 230 feet deep. These sacred waters are the most colorful geothermal area in the New Zealand. It’s known as the Champagne Pool at the Artist’s Palette at the Wai-o-tapu Thermal Wonderland. We love these pics!

Famous geothermal pool Waiotapu, New Zealand - The Champagne Pool

Famous geothermal pool Waiotapu, New Zealand – The Champagne Pool. Photo #1 by Christopher Schoenbohm

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Double Rainbow Over Castle Geyser

Steam phase eruption of Castle Geyser shows a double rainbow at Yellowstone National Park. Photo by Mila Zinkova