America’s Most Iconic Statue: Lady Liberty [55 PICS]

July 6th, 2013 Permalink

For 127 years, she’s watched over and welcomed people to the USA. Officially, her name is ‘Liberty Enlightening the World,’ but most call her the Statue of Liberty or Lady Liberty. She is surely America’s most iconic statue. Lady Liberty is made from 300 copper sheets, suspended from a steel framework, which have naturally oxidized over the years making her appear green. She is 151 feet tall, standing on a 65 foot concrete and granite pedestal upon a courtyard shaped like an 11-pointed star. Located on Liberty Island, Lady Liberty calls out, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free. The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me.” On July Fourth, America’s 237th birthday, Lady Liberty reopened to the public. Here are some rare and historic photos and fun facts, mixed in with stunning shots of the Statue of Liberty. [55 Photos]

Lady Liberty, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886

Countless millions have been awed by visiting America’s most iconic statue. Lady Liberty, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. After the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, the Statue of Liberty “reopened” on July 4, 2013. Photo #1 by Mr. Nixter

Sunset, jet, sailboat and Statue of Liberty

NPS Did You Know: “The French ship “Isere” transported the Statue of Liberty’s 300 copper pieces packed in 214 crates to America. Although the ship nearly sank in rough seas, it arrived in New York on June 17, 1885. The Statue’s parts remained unassembled for nearly a year until the pedestal was completed in 1886.” Photo #2 by Barry Yanowitz


Statue of Liberty, New York City - July 4, 2013

Statue of Liberty, New York City as seen on July 4, 2013, the day America’s icon reopened: “Hundreds of thousands of visitors swarmed Lady Liberty and her home, Liberty Island, a short ferry ride from Lower Manhattan and uninhabited save for the 127-year-old woman who symbolizes freedom, from her shimmering torch to the broken chain at her feet.” Photo #3 by Douglas Palmer

The beaten copper clad figure known as the Statue of Liberty is actually called 'Liberty Enlightening the World'

The beaten copper clad figure known as the Statue of Liberty is actually called ‘Liberty Enlightening the World’,” noted the photographer. She was closed for renovations for most of 1938, then again for a major restoration project from 1984 to 1986. After 9/11, Liberty Island was closed due to security concerns for three years before opening in 2004; “the pedestal reopened in 2004 and the statue in 2009, with limits on the number of visitors allowed to ascend to the crown.” Interior upgrades was cited for her closure from from Oct. 2011 – 2012. She then opened for only one day before Hurricane Sandy, with Liberty Island and the statue reopening on July 4, 2013. Photo #4 by Koshy Koshy

Statue of Liberty National Monument

Before reopening on America’s birthday, NPS reported,”On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall over New Jersey. The Statue of Liberty is on Liberty Island, a 12 acre island located a mile south of lower Manhattan. Normally, the confines of the New York Harbor protect Liberty Island from extreme weather. However, when Hurricane Sandy hit, Liberty Island was in the direct path of a massive storm surge. Nearby in Battery Park, water rose 13.8 feet (4.2m). On Liberty Island, that meant nearly 75% of the Island was under water.” Although the statue was not damage, “the Island’s utilities, backup generator, and power systems were destroyed. The passenger and auxiliary docks were severely damaged and brick pathways have been uprooted around the Island.” Photo #5 by NPS

Liberty soaks in her morning sun

Liberty soaks in her morning sun. Visitors to her crown must have prior reservations to climb 354 steps up the narrow, winding staircase. A 40 feet ladder leads to the torch, but no visitors are allowed access to the balcony surrounding the torch; that stopped in 1916 for “safety reasons” after the ‘Black Tom’ explosion. Photo #6 by NPS

Rainbow appears in Liberty's FDNY spray mist

Rainbow appears in Liberty’s FDNY spray mist. Liberty Island restoration after Hurricane Sandy included 53,000 new paving stones, 2,000 feet of granite, and security and surveillance upgrades such as a new-and-improved facial recognition system. Photo #7 by NPS

Statue of Liberty at sunrise

NPS noted, “While most of New York City sleeps in after long nights of holiday parties, Park Rangers at the Statue of Liberty arrive early to prepare the Island for the day. This week, Ranger Bill captured the Lady just as the sun started to peak over Brooklyn.” Photo #8 by NPS

Birds, boats and Lady Liberty at Sunset

Did you know? “Bartholdi placed his Statue on a federally owned island called ‘Bedloe’s’ in New York Harbor. His original concept was to place a statue of a woman at the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869.” Photo #9 by Dan Alcalde

Governors Island Waterfall and Lady Liberty

If you can’t make it to Liberty Island right now in person, then the National Park Service, EarthCam and The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, Inc offer numerous web cams for your armchair viewing pleasure, including TorchCam, CrownCam, Live Streaming View from the Torch, Statue of Liberty Cam, and even an Interactive Panorama from the top of the Statue of Liberty TorchCam. Photo #10 by Barry Yanowitz

Model of Miss Liberty's left hand holding tablet shows the method of construction

Rare, historic photos: This enlarged sectional model of left hand holding tablet shows the method of construction. From “Album des Travaux de Construction de la Statue Colossale de la Liberte destinee an Port de New-York,” released in 1883. Wikipedia explained, “The head and arm had been built with assistance from architect Eugène Viollet-le-Duc, who fell ill in 1879. He soon died, leaving no indication of how he intended to transition from the copper skin to his proposed masonry pier. The following year, designer Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi was able to obtain the services of the innovative designer and builder Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel.” As you probably guessed, Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel is best known for the world-famous Eiffel Tower. Photo #11 by Albert Fernique (1841?-1898) / NPS Historical Handbook / Library of Congress

Winter 1882, Workmen constructing the Statue of Liberty in Bartholdi's Parisian warehouse workshop

Workmen constructing the Statue of Liberty in Bartholdi’s Parisian warehouse workshop; first model; left hand; and quarter-size head–Winter 1882. Photo #12 by Albert Fernique (1841?-1898) / Library of Congress

Close up of broken shackles on Statue of Liberty's foot, Lady Liberty, axe, chains

NPS Did You Know: “Freedom is not standing still. A symbolic feature that people cannot see is the broken chain wrapped around the Statue’s feet. Protruding from the bottom of her robe, the broken chains symbolize her free forward movement, enlightening the world with her torch free from oppression and servitude.” Top: The Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor, the toes of Miss Liberty found a home on American soil, circa 1885. Bottom: Superintendent O. Camp by broken shackle and chain, showing the large scale upon which Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, the sculptor, worked. Right: Broken shackles, axe head and left foot at base of Lady Liberty, circa 1984. Photo #13 by Statue of Liberty, Liberty Island, Manhattan / Library of Congress & #14 by NPS
& #15 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

Observation windows in Statue of Liberty's tiara, circa 1985

Observation windows in Statue of Liberty’s tiara, circa 1985. According to NPS, “Visiting the crown of the Statue of Liberty is one of the most rewarding experiences of any trip to New York City. Starting in 2009, the National Park Service implemented a new system that requires advanced reservations for access to the crown. This reservation system is much different than how the public accessed the crown prior to 2001. The procedure for reserving crown tickets and accessing the crown is detailed” on the NPS site. Photo #16 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

View up staircase of the interior of Statue of Liberty main frame, circa 1988

View up staircase of the interior of main frame, circa 1988. Wikipedia explained, “In the early 1980s, it was found to have deteriorated to such an extent that a major restoration was required. While the statue was closed from 1984 to 1986, the torch and a large part of the internal structure were replaced.” Photo #17 by Jet Lowe / Library of Congress

Near the bottom of the Liberty sculpture looking up, 1988

Near the bottom of the sculpture looking up. Photo #18 by Jet Lowe / Library of Congress

Close-up details of Lady Liberty's right foot showing missing rivets in 1984

Close-up details of right foot showing missing rivets in 1984. Photo #19 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

Statue of Liberty tablet and torch in 1985 during repairs

The height of her hand is 16 ft 5 in (5 m); her index finger is 8 ft 1 in (2.44 m); her right arm is 42 ft (12.8 m) in length. The tablet is 23 ft 7 in (7.19 m) in length with a width of 13 ft 7 in (7.19 m). Left: Detail of tablet with inscription “JULY IV. MDCCLXXVI” in 1985. That means means July 4, 1776, and it’s the only inscription found on the Statue of Liberty itself. Right: Detail of torch with worker dismantling scaffolding in 1985. Photo #20 by Jack E Boucher / Library of Congress & #21 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

1984 view looking down on top of head showing body enclosed in scaffolding

1984 view looking down on top of head showing body enclosed in scaffolding. Also in 1984, “the Statue of Liberty was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The UNESCO ‘Statement of Significance’ describes the statue as a ‘masterpiece of the human spirit’ that ‘endures as a highly potent symbol—inspiring contemplation, debate and protest—of ideals such as liberty, peace, human rights, abolition of slavery, democracy and opportunity’.” Photo #22 by Jet Lowe / Library of Congress

80s repairs, Statue of Liberty's face and hair ringlets

Her nose is 4 ft 6 in (1.48 m) and she measures 17 ft 3 in (5.26 m) from chin to cranium. Left: Left side of Lady Liberty’s face in 1984. Right: Detail behind left ear, showing damage to a ringlet of her hair in 1985. Photo #23 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress & #24 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

1984 before scaffolding surrounded the statue, overall view of Liberty Island looking northwest with Jersey City in the background

1984 before scaffolding surrounded the statue, overall view of Liberty Island looking northwest with Jersey City in the background. Photo #25 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

Statue of Liberty old flame in 1984, new flame in 1985

Left: 1984 — View of the “old” flame, torch platform and fingers on hand, looking northeast. Right: 1985 — New torch and flame in place as workers begin dismantling the scaffolding. During the day and at dusk, the gold-leaf coating on the new torch reflects the sun’s rays; after dark, 16 floodlights light up in the torch, light it up. Photo #26 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress & #27 by Jack E. Boucher / Library of Congress

Original torch of the Statue of Liberty constructed in 1876 and taken down in 1984

Original torch of the Statue of Liberty, constructed in 1876, and taken down in 1984. It’s currently located in the monument’s lobby. Photo #28 by NPS

Lady Liberty face lift, then celebrates 100 years old

Left: Here is the statue in 1984. In 2011, NPS wrote, “We are about to undergo another renovation–but this time there will be no scaffolding and Liberty Island will remain open to visitation.” Right: Lady Liberty at 100. Centennial celebrations as seen from Battery Park in NYC as Lady Liberty turned 100 years old. The statue was first installed on June 19,1885; the centennial celebration was held during Independence Day weekend in 1986. Photo #29 by NPS & #30 by ~BostonBill~

Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island from sky

Statue of Liberty and Liberty Island from the sky in 2010. The island is 14.7 acres and wasn’t officially called Liberty until 1956. “In 1937, by proclamation 2250, President Franklin D. Roosevelt expanded the Statue of Liberty National Monument to include all of Bedloe’s Island, and in 1956, an act of Congress officially renamed it. It became part of the National Register of Historic Places site Statue of Liberty National Monument, Ellis Island and Liberty Island in 1966.” The Height of copper statue is 151 ft. 1 in. (46 m); the foundation pedestal at ground level to the tip of her torch is 305 ft 1 in. (93 m). Photo #31 by Blaž Vizjak

Liberty attacked by waves and storm surge from Hurricane Sandy

Liberty attacked by waves and storm surge from Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Photo #32 by Gordon Tarpley

Rainbow over the Statue of Liberty after a stormy day

Yet there she still stands under a rainbow after a stormy day. Photo #33 by NPS

During the winter snows, stay warm and burn off calories by writing your name on the Liberty Island lawn

NPS suggested, “During the winter snows, stay warm and burn off calories by writing your name on the Liberty Island lawn (using your feet).” Photo #34 by NPS

Moon and Lady Liberty's torch, Statue of Liberty & Seagull

The “new” copper torch is covered in 24K gold leaf and lighted by floodlight at night. Left: Moon and Lady Liberty’s torch on New Year’s Eve. Right: Seagull flies over Miss Liberty. Photo #35 by NPS & #36 by David Paul Ohmer

A beautiful Liberty Island sunset

A beautiful Liberty Island sunset. Things to do on Liberty Island include visiting the NPS Information Center, with advanced reservations recommended you can visit the pedestal, and it’s required to visit her crown. It took 21 years for the Statue of Liberty to progress from an idea to a colossal copper statue and “the Liberty Island Museum chronicles the difficulties and triumphs two countries overcame to build a symbol of liberty. The museum also covers how the Statue of Liberty’s interpretation has changed since its construction in 1886.” Photo #37 by EarthCam / NPS

The Sculpture Garden is located on a walkway behind the colossal Statue of Liberty

The Sculpture Garden is located on a walkway behind the colossal statue. NPS added, “Here guests are introduced to five important people involved in the story of Liberty.” The National Park Service has an entire section about important people. Photo #38 by NPS

Liberty Island, Statue of Liberty from behind

Left: Mall grounds at Liberty Island with Statue in background. Right: NPS wrote, “From this angle you may more readily understand just how Mr. Eiffel’s tower supports Mr. Bartholdi’s thin copper plates.” Photo #39 by NPS & #40 by NPS

Coast Guard in NYC after devastation of Hurricane Sandy

The Coast Guard wrote, “The crew aboard the 270-foot Coast Guard Cutter Spencer, homeported in Boston, and an MH-65 Dolphin crew are patrolling in New York Harbor, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. The Coast Guard is working in partnership with local and federal agencies to provide security and assist in recovery operations to the citizens of New York and New Jersey after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.” U.S. Coast Guard Photo #41 by Petty Officer 3rd Class Cynthia Oldham

Lady Liberty and stars and stripes forever, New York, July 2012

Lady Liberty and stars and stripes forever, New York, July 2012. Photo #42 by Gwenael Piaser

Liberty, lady in the harbor

NPS Did You Know: “The only way to get to Liberty Island is by using the Statue of Liberty – Ellis Island Ferry system. Private vessels are not allowed to dock at Liberty and Ellis Islands.” Photo #43 by Mobilus In Mobili

Looking upward from the top of Fort Wood

Looking upward from the top of Fort Wood. In total, the Statue of Liberty weighs 450,000 pounds (204.1 m tons). Photo #44 by NPS

A step ahead and impressive at any angle

She’s impressive at any angle. Recall that “Freedom is not standing still” as she lifts her foot from the broken shackles at her feet. Photo #45 by Kai Schreiber

View of Liberty's tablet and Fort Wood from the crown

View of Liberty’s tablet and Fort Wood from the crown. Photo #46 by NPS

Closeup of Statue of Liberty's face

Closeup of Miss Liberty. Did you know: “The Statue of Liberty’s face was said to be modeled after the sculptor’s mother, Charlotte. This colossal statuary follows design going back to ancient Greek and Roman civilizations.” The distance across her eyes is 2 ft 6 in (.76 m); ear to ear, her head thickness is 10 ft (3.05 m). Her mouth is 3 ft wide (.91 m). Photo #47 by Ludovic Bertron

Statue of Liberty National Monument at dusk and night

Left: The granite in Liberty’s pedestal and fort are cast in pink hues this dawn. Right: Statue of Liberty National Monument at night. Photo #48 by NPS & #49 by NPS

Sunset over Battery Park and Statue of Liberty

Sunset over Battery Park. NPS wrote, “Ellis Island is not its own National Park site. It was added to the National Park system in May of 1965 by President Lyndon B. Johnson. It is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument and was opened to the public as a museum of immigration in 1990….Since the passage of the ‘Steerage Act of 1819′, passenger manifests have been required for all arriving vessels to be delivered to the U.S. Government and reported to Congress. This document, used for inspection at Ellis Island, has become an important starting point in researching family history.” Photo #50 by Dan Nguyen

Lady Liberty at dusk

Lady Liberty and New York Harbor at dusk as seen from Staten Island Ferry. Did you know: “Several agencies have been caretakers for the Statue. The U.S. Lighthouse Board cared for the statue as the first electric lighthouse or ‘navigational aid’ 1886 – 1902, followed by the War Department 1902 – 1933 and since 1933 she has been cared for by employees of the National Park Service.” Photo #51 by joiseyshowaa

Statue of Liberty at Sunset in January

Statue of Liberty at Sunset in January. “For your ‘safety and security‘ when visiting this icon of our freedom, you have to pass through the primary security screening, and in some cases, a second security screening.” Photo #52 by Dan Alcalde

Lady Liberty and a bitterly cold sunset

Bitterly cold sunset. It was reported, “Liberty Island’s recovery, in which crews laid down 42,000 board-feet of new deck, 2,000 feet of hedging, and new electrical, heating, and cooling systems, stands in stark contrast to Ellis Island, which remains closed. Ellis Island was completely submerged after the storm, threatening the island’s archives, which were later removed by the National Park Service Museum Emergency Response Team and taken to a climate-controlled facility in Maryland.” Photo #53 by Drew Geraets

Statue of Liberty National Monument at night

Statue of Liberty National Monument at night. NPS has an entire section devoted to Who, What, Where, When, Why and How. Photo #54 by NPS

Lady Liberty in all her glory, seen during a trip down the Hudson, on the Staten Island ferry

Lady Liberty in all her glory, seen during a trip down the Hudson, on the Staten Island ferry. In 1903, an engraved bronze plaque was mounted inside the Statue of Liberty with “The New Colossus” poem by Emma Lazarus: “Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame, With conquering limbs astride from land to land; Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand. A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame. ‘Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!’ cries she With silent lips. ‘Give me your tired, your poor, Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door’!” Photo #55 by Souparna


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