Unsurpassed & Sublime Beauty of Grand Teton National Park [60 PICS]

May 3rd, 2012 Permalink

Grand Teton National Park is 310,000 breathtaking acres of wow! 40 miles of jagged peaks making up the Teton Range tower 7,000 feet above gorgeous Jackson Hole valley. The unsurpassed and sublime beauty of the natural landscape and the equally famous abundant wildlife have been called inspirational, stunning, spectacular and it will take your breath away. NPS describes the park as, “Rising above a scene rich with extraordinary wildlife, pristine lakes, and alpine terrain, the Teton Range stands monument to the people who fought to protect it. These are mountains of the imagination. Mountains that led to the creation of Grand Teton National Park where you can explore over 200 miles of trails, float the Snake River or enjoy the serenity of this remarkable place.” Located in Northwestern Wyoming the park is only 10 miles from Yellowstone. Grand Teton National Park is the 8th most visited national park in the U.S. We dare you to stare at the magnificent scenery of this national park and not be struck with desire to hop in your car and head out for an epic nature adventure. We love these pics! [60 Photos]

Rainbow Forever, Moulton Barn at Grand Teton National Park Wyoming

‘Rainbow Forever,’ Moulton Barn at Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. Everywhere you look, this park has stunning scenes, making it easy to understand why in 2011 this was the 8th most visited national park in America. Photo #1 by wallpapers5

Grand Tetons and waterfalls

Grand Tetons and waterfalls. The National Park Service reports, “The elevation of the park ranges from 6,320 feet on the sagebrush-dominated valley floor to 13,770 feet on the windswept granite summit of the Grand Teton. Between the summit and plain, forests carpet the mountainsides.” Photo #2 by Chris


Middle Teton, Grand Teton National Park

At 12,804 feet (3,903 m) the Middle Teton is the third highest peak in the Teton Range. Wikipedia states, “What is known as the southwest couloir provides the easiest route to the summit. Other sections on the mountain are rated as high as class 5.11, with the Middle Teton Glacier route considered to be the most technically advanced.” Photo #3 by K. Finch / NPS

The Derelict House visits Eve's Nature Mountain and Lake

‘The Derelict House visits Eve’s Nature Mountain and Lake.’ The photographer wrote, “Following the bogging down in the mudflats off Brisbane , the traumatized Derelict House (DH) needed severe R&R. We tried to get into to a few soothing spots and finally Eve’s Nature came up trumps. So we loaded DH onto a barge and now floats serenely in this superb scenery Jenny Lake, Grand Teton National Park, WY, USA.” Looks like a great place to unplug and poof off the grid. Photo #4 by JayVeeAre (JvR)

Elk grazing at Grand Teton NP

Elk cows graze sagebrush meadows along the Teton Range during summer. According to NPS, “Grand Teton National Park is world-renowned for its wildlife viewing opportunities. Some of the most sought-after animals found inside the park include: moose, black and grizzly bears, pronghorn, elk, bald eagles, gray wolves, coyotes and bison. Always stay a safe distance of at least 100 yards from wolves and bears and 25 yards from all other wildlife.” Photo #5 by S. Zenner / NPS

Jackson Lake Lodge outlook in the Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States. View over the Willow Flats area to the Teton Range with the Mount Moran and his Skillet Glacier (12605 ft) in the middle

Jackson Lake Lodge outlook. View over the Willow Flats area to the Teton Range with the Mount Moran and his Skillet Glacier (12605 ft) in the middle. Photo #6 by Michael Gäbler

Bison at Mormon Row barn

Not in the same spot as Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota where the buffalo still roam but Grand Teton has its own share of bison. Photo #7 by Jeff Few

Gorgeous Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Wow, so gorgeous! NPS explained, “While the Teton Range dominates the landscape, it is the interplay of mountains, faults, glaciers, forests, rivers, lakes, wetlands, and geologic features that create the overal grandeur of Grand Teton National Park. Taken individually, each feature is fascinating and worthy of protection, but when combined as they are in Grand Teton, they create a mosaic that is inspiring beyond compare.” Photo #8 by Latham Jenkins

Mountain Lions in Grand Teton National Park

The top photos shows a Mountain Lion standing on cobbles next to the water. Although mountain lions are present in Grand Teton, they are rarely seen but here is one walking through a meadow (left) and another large cat standing on log above a lake. Photo #9 by Lee / NPS, & #10 by Stratton / NPS, & #11 by Lee / NPS

Oxbow Bend at Fall - Grand Teton NP

Oxbow Bend at Fall. Grand Teton National Park is a terrific place to visit any time of year, but autumn, from about beginning of September through mid-October, is “especially magical for a number of reasons. Beautiful fall colors, wildlife, and smaller crowds make for a wonderful and relaxing time of year.” This stunning scene is located one mile east of Jackson Lake Junction. NPS suggests viewing wildlife from here, such as bald eagles, beavers, muskrats and moose along the willows at the water’s edge. At times, elk graze in open aspen groves to the east of Oxbow Bend. Photo #12 by P. Hattaway / NPS

Hidden Falls near Jenny Lake. This hike can be 1.2 or 5.2 miles roundtrip. According to the waterfalls of Grand Teton NP, “Hidden Falls is not really a falls, but a 200 foot cascade. There are two ways to get to the trail on the west side of Jenny lake. One is by a shuttle boat from the Jenny Lake east shore boat dock at the southeast end of the lake. The second route to get to Hidden Falls is by hiking around the south end of Jenny Lake to the trail to Cascade Canyon (this adds four miles roundtrip to the hike). While at Hidden Falls, it is well worth an extra .5 mile hike to Inspiration Point for a magnification view of the Jenny Lake, Jackson Hole, the Gros Ventre and Wind River Mountains.” Photo #13 by Smaldone / NPS

Oxbow Bend outlook in the Grand Teton National Park in the Teton Range, Wyoming, United States

The photographer wrote, “Oxbow Bend outlook in the Grand Teton National Park. View over the Snake River to the Mount Moran with the Skillet Glacier (12,605 ft-3,842 m), Bivouac Peak (10,825 ft-3,299 m) and Eagles Rest Peak (11,258 ft-3,431 m) in the Teton Range, Wyoming, United States.” Photo #14 by Michael Gäbler

Widest Tetons with glacier and lake

Widest Tetons with glacier and lake. The photographer noted, “This is so cool as you can see the moraines deposited by the glacier and the lake that was formed above the moraines!!!!” Photo #15 by Philippe Henry

Black bear sow and cub climbing tree

Black bear sow and cub climbing tree. According to NPS safety in bear country, “Allowing a bear to obtain human food, even once, often results in aggressive bear behavior. Aggressive bears are a threat to human safety and must be relocated or killed. Do not feed bears or other wildlife for any reason.” Photo #16 by Stratton / NPS

Grand Tetons National Park -- The John Moulton Barn on Mormon Row at the base of the Tetons

This gorgeous setting is viewed from Jackson Hole valley looking west at the John Moulton Barn on Mormon Row at the base of the Tetons. According to Wikipedia, “Grand Teton National Park is named for Grand Teton, the tallest mountain in the Teton Range. The naming of the mountains is attributed to early 19th century French speaking trappers—”les trois tetons” (the three breasts) was later anglicized and shortened to Tetons.” Photo #17 by Jon Sullivan, PD

Jackson Lake and Grand Teton National Park

Grand Teton in the Teton Range has an elevation of 13,770 feet, ranking it the 8th highest elevation within in a U.S. National Park. This photos shows Jackson Lake and Grand Teton National Park. Photo #18 by S. Zenner / NPS

Chapel of Transfiguration -- Grand Teton National Park

The Chapel of Transfiguration was built in 1925 and framed so a spectacular view of the Cathedral Group peaks show in a large window behind the altar. Photo #19 by Riddell / NPS

Taggert Lake, Grand Teton National Park

Want to get away from the crowds on Jenny Lake trails? Just down the road from South Jenny “is the trail head to Taggart and Bradley lakes, named for two members of the 1872 Hayden expedition. Like other hikes in Grand Teton, this one is best made during the early-morning or early-evening hours, when it’s cooler and there’s less traffic.” This is Taggart Lake with Grand Teton and Buck Mountain; it’s about one mile away from Bradley Lake. The National Park Service offers Taggart Lake Trailhead and other hiking brochures. Photo #20 by Sarah Zenner / NPS

Grand Teton with snow, Moose Entrance, fall

Grand Teton with snow, Moose Entrance at fall. Photo #21 by NPS

Jackson Lake - Grand Teton NP

Thousands of years ago, glaciers carved most of the lakes in the park. This is Grand Teton NP’s largest lake, Jackson Lake which is a natural lake raised by a 39-foot tall man-made dam. Photo #22 by Kimberly Finch / NPS

Death Canyon and creek

View of the creek in Death Canyon. Photo #23 by Sarah Zenner / NPS

Grizzly bears, sow and cub in meadow

Grizzly bears, sow and cub in meadow. Both black bears and grizzly bears thrive in this park. NPS bear safety brochure states, “You may encounter a bear anywhere at anytime. Some of the most popular trails pass through excellent bear habitat. Bears will usually move out of the way if they hear you approaching.” If a bear approaches or charges you, Do Not Run! If you are planning to hike or camp around bears, you really should read the bear brochure as it is filled with all sorts of wisdom. Photo #24 by Lee / NPS

Lake Solitude at Grand Teton NP

This is Lake Solitude. The cliffs rising above the lake form a drainage divide between the west side of the Teton Range and the east side of the Teton Range. Photo #25 by S. Zenner / NPS

Wolves and wolf pups in Grand Teton National Park

Wolves and wolf pups in Grand Teton National Park. Photo #26 by NPS, & #27 by Smaldone / NPS, & #28 by NPS

Cascade Canyon - Grand Teton National Park

Cascade Canyon. Photo #29 by Al_HikesAZ

Oxbow Lake Panorama

Oxbow Lake Panorama. Photo #30 by Sathish J

North Fork Cascade Canyon

North Fork Cascade Canyon. Photo #34 by S. Zenner / NPS

Marion Lake at Grand Teton National Park

Wild flowers and Marion Lake. The park “can be separated into three distinct zones: the sagebrush valley, the forest floor, and the alpine zone,” NPS states. “The wildflowers of Grand Teton National Park usually bloom May through September. There are only about 60 continuous frost-free days a year in Jackson Hole, so the growing season is very short and the dominant blooming flowers change quickly from week to week.” Photo #35 by S. Zenner / NPS

Snake River at Schwabachers Landing

Snake River and the Teton Range at Schwabachers Landing. Photo #36 by E. Himmel / NPS

Panorama Grand Teton National Park

Panorama Grand Teton National Park. Photo #37 by Anna

Middle Teton from Garnet Canyon Trail

Middle Teton from Garnet Canyon Trail. See the dark line bisecting the peak? This geologic feature known as the Black Dike; it is a diabase intrusion into older gneiss and is visible on the east face of Middle Teton. Photo #38 by Kimberly Finch / NPS

String Lake with Mount Moran reflection

String Lake with Mount Moran reflection. Photo #39 by S. Zenner / NPS

Grand Teton National Park Grizzly Bears

Grand Teton National Park Grizzly Bears. Photo #40 by NPS, & #41 by Stratton / NPS, & #42 by oldbilluk

Bull Moose (Alces alces) with Magpie, Grand Teton National Park

Bull Moose (Alces alces) with Magpie. Grand Teton National Park is known to have 16 large and 45 small mammal species. Photo #43 by Dan Dzurisin

Bald Eagle, Great Horned Owl, Great Gray Owl with owlets

Bald Eagle perching; Great Horned Owl at right; Great Gray Owl on nest at bottom left. Photo #44 by Kragel / NPS & #45 by Foott / NPS, & #46 by Foott / NPS

Herd of Bison grazing at Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

View of bison herd grazing and the Tetons. Photo #47 by R. Wiles / NPS

Bradley Lake looking up Garnet Canyon, Grand Teton

Bradley Lake looking up Garnet Canyon. Photo #48 by S. Zenner / NPS

More magnificent wildlife at Great Teton National Park. Bobcat;  two Bull Elk fighting; and Bighorn Ram

More magnificent wildlife at Great Teton National Park. Bobcat, two Bull Elk fighting, and a Bighorn Ram in the snow. Photo #49 by Lee / NPS, & #50 by Stratton / NPS, & #51 by NPS

Bearpaw Lake at Grant Teton NP

Bearpaw Lake ringed with wildflowers and conifers. Photo #52 by S. Zenner / NPS

Paintbrush Canyon trail with wildflowers

Paintbrush Canyon trail with wildflowers. Photo #53 by S. Zenner / NPS

Cathedral Group at Grand Teton National Park

The much-photographed and magnificent Cathedral Group. Photo #54 by NPS

Beaver dam at Schwabachers Landing, Teton Range

Beaver dam at Schwabachers Landing, Teton Range. Photo #55 by E. Himmel / NPS

Death Canyon, Static Peak Trail, bird's eye view

Death Canyon, Static Peak Trail, bird’s eye view. Photo #56 by S. Zenner / NPS

Looking down on Lake Solitude wildflowers

Looking down on Lake Solitude and wildflowers. Photo #57 by S. Zenner / NPS

Middle Teton and Grand Teton in the winter

Middle Teton and Grand Teton during the brutally cold Wyoming winter. NPS states, “Long, snowy, and bitterly cold winters make the climate of Jackson Hole unforgiving. The coldest temperature ever recorded in Grand Teton National Park was -63°F, and snow often blankets the landscape from early November to May.” Photo #58 by NPS

Leigh Lake

Reflection of mountains in Leigh Lake and view of Leigh Canyon. Jenny and Leigh Lakes are named for the fur trapper “Beaver” Dick Leigh and his wife Jenny who helped the Hayden party explore the region in 1872. The couple impressed the explorers so much that they named the lakes in their honor. Photo #59 by S. Zenner / NPS

Sunrise and unsurpassed beauty of nature of Grand Teton National Park

The photographer related this story of what it takes to capture a breathtaking scene like The Tetons. “Mount Moran I believe has her head in a cloud. The French trappers had other names for the mountain group. They missed their girls. I insisted that we spend the night in the Tetons to perhaps capture a sunrise or sunset from the spot that photographers line and swish their hips to protect their prize winner. We arrived at 7:30 p.m. and the pull out was empty. I got out of the car and set up a tripod and watched breeding plumaged Common Loons and Canada Geese. It was a dull mountain scene but full of birds and naughty elk playing. I got back in the car and pulled out the wheat thins and a bottle of wine and said–here “play angry birds, I think if we wait the sky will turn pink like it did when Old Faithful did it’s thing last night”. So we waited in the lonely pull out. Then the pink pinked and a few cars pulled in and then the red grew and another car pulled in. The youngsters got out their iphones and took a snap. I paid my way through college working summers near here. I have never seen the mountains so beautiful–maybe because I was serving thawed frozen trout on a bed of lemons and almonds.” Photo #60 by Elizabeth Haslam


8 Responses to “Unsurpassed & Sublime Beauty of Grand Teton National Park [60 PICS]”

Leave a Reply