Thanksgiving: Food for Thought . . . ’cause that’s all some folks have [35 PICS]

November 18th, 2011 Permalink

Food for thought . . . because that’s all some folks have. Somewhere in the war between the 1% and the 99% are The Forgotten, The Invisible, the Homeless and Hungry with no hope. So while you are preparing for Thanksgiving (or any time) could you not buy a little extra to donate to a food pantry, a soup kitchen? You won’t be sorry; those little random acts of kindness will give you a warm fuzzy glow inside. If you don’t have the time around a holiday to help out at a soup kitchen, and you don’t have the money to help, chew on these images as food for thought because thoughts, regrets and broken dreams are all some folks will feast on this Thanksgiving. This may be hard to look at? Be thankful for all that you do have. [35 Photos]
This one is for you, Mich.

Where Have All the Good Times Gone

Where Have All the Good Times Gone? Photo #1 by Noel Feans

Luck Turned Its Back On Me

Luck Turned Its Back On Me. Photo #2 by Manuel Callejon


hitting rock bottom

Hitting rock bottom. Photo #3 by Lee Nachtigal

What hungry and homeless looks like up-close and personal

‘Mike’– What hungry and homeless looks like up-close and personal. Photo #4 by Leroy Skalstad

Life can be hard sometimes

Life can be hard sometimes. Photo #5 by Nana B Agyei

Homeless and sleeping in D.C

Homeless and sleeping in D.C. Photo #6 by

Notwithstanding a few drawbacks, there is still much to be thankful for this winter 1910

Guess what, America, we’ve been here before and came out of it. Front page of the New York Tribune on Thanksgiving November 20, 1910. “Notwithstanding a few drawbacks, there is still much to be thankful for this winter.” Photo #7 by Library of Congress

heartwrenching homeless children

Heartwrenching: homeless children. Photo #8 by Alex (elfon)

The Damm Family in Their Car, Los Angeles, CA

The Damm Family in Their Car, Los Angeles, CA, 1987. Photo #9 by Mary Ellen Mark via Thomas Hawk

Still hungry. Still homeless. Still need help.

Still hungry. Still homeless. Still need help. Photo #10 by Ed Yourdon

Retired homeless fisherman

Retired homeless fisherman. Photo #11 by Pedro Ribeiro Simões

Homeless in the Haight

Homeless in the Haight. Photo #12 by Tony the Misfit

Homeless and hungry, but still sharing his meal with the pigeons

Homeless and hungry, but still sharing his meal with the pigeons. Photo #13 by Pedro Ribeiro Simões

The Outcast -- Stray Dogs and Paper Walls

The Outcast — Stray Dogs and Paper Walls. Photo #14 by SpaceShoe [Learning to live with the crisis]

homeless man lost in thought

Shattered dreams and regret. This homeless man is lost in thought. Photo #15 by Henadz Freshphoto.ru

The Forgotten Man

The Forgotten Man. Photo #16 by Alex E. Proimos

Homeless with pigeon on a head

Homeless with a pigeon on his head. Photo #17 by Kamil Porembiński

I had a dream

I had a dream. Photo #18 by straman

1904 This man prefers to hunt his Thanksgiving dinner. These boys will beg theirs

Thanksgiving November 20, 1904 front page of the New York Tribune.”This man prefers to hunt his Thanksgiving dinner. These boys will beg theirs.” Photo #20 by Library of Congress

Scramble for pennies, Thanksgiving

The tradition of Thanksgiving Masking: poor children would “mask” their faces and then beg for food or pennies. “Scramble for pennies” on Thanksgiving [between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915] from Bain News Service. Photo #21 by Library of Congress

Poor children, Maskers, scramble for pennies on Thanksgiving

Bain News Service circa 1910. Maskers scrambled for pennies on Thanksgiving like a tradition from 1780 – 1940s. Photo #22 by Library of Congress

Thanksgiving Bain News Service circa 1910

Thanksgiving “Maskers” Bain News Service circa 1910. BoingBoing explained the Thanksgiving Maskers: “Progressive era reformers regarded child begging on Thanksgiving as immoral and thought children who engaged in it should be arrested. Why were parents not able to control their offspring? The New York Times in 1903 wanted to know. The newspaper castigated parents who allowed children to demand treats or money as indecent. The police tried to enforce a ban against begging. In response to complaints from the public, the clergy, school superintendents, and classroom teachers issued warnings. The New York Times in November of 1930 worried that demanding coins could teach children to become professional beggars and blackmailers and that children were annoying the public. Begging, decided the paper, was a ‘malicious influence on the morals of children of the city’.” Photo #23 by Library of Congress

Thanksgiving turkey

Thanksgiving turkey. Bain News Service between 1910 – 1915. Photo #24 by Library of Congress

Give me Weed

Now for something a bit lighter of heart. Photo #25 by Ian Sane

Homeless Veteran on the streets of Boston

Homeless Veteran on the streets of Boston, MA. Photo #26 by Matthew Woitunski

Homeless and hungry

Homeless and hungry. Photo #27 by Ed Yourdon

Homeless woman with dogs

Homeless woman with dogs. Photo #28 by Franco Folini

Homeless with puppies

Dogs, a man’s best friend even when homeless and hungry? Photo #29 by Torcello Trio

anonymous homeless

Homeless Anonymous? ;-) Photo #31 by Poster Boy NYC

Portrait of homeless man

Portrait of homeless man. Photo #32 by Leroy Allen Skalstad

The Hand - can you lend one?

The Hand – can you lend a helping one? Homeless and hungry is a worldwide issue. Photo #33 by Alex E. Proimos

Banksy 'Follow your dreams' cancelled

Those dreams people wanted to follow? Cancelled. ~ Banksy. Photo #34 by Chris Devers

Homeless. Please help. Thank you

Homeless. Please help. Thank you. Photo #35 by Ed Yourdon


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