Heaven aka Navajo Nation – Canyon de Chelly National Monument

April 27th, 2011 Permalink

Canyon de Chelly National Monument is located on the Navajo Nation and is about 84,000 acres of gorgeous land which has more than 4,000 years of human occupation. That makes this land one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America. Canyon de Chelly has thousands of years of perserved culture like cliff dwelling architecture, artifacts, and rock art. The National Park Service and the Navajo Nation share resources and continue to work in partnership to manage this breathtakingly beautiful national monument. Canyon de Chelly National Monument is part one of Heaven aka the Navajo Nation. [50 Photos]
Magnificent Monument Valley is part two in the tribute to the Navajo Nation. Awe-inspiring Antelope Canyon (30 PICS) Navajo Nation Tribute Part 3

Canyon de Chelly, Navajo by Edward S. Curtis

Canyon de Chelly — Navajo. This awesome photo was taken in 1904. Seven riders on horseback and dog trek against background of canyon cliffs. It wasn’t until 1931 when President Hoover authorized the area as a national monument to preserve the important archeological resources that span more than 4,000 years of human occupation. The monument encompasses approximately 84,000 acres of lands located entirely on the Navajo Nation with roughly 40 families residing within the park boundaries. Photo #1 by Edward S. Curtis

Canyon de Chelly, Arizona, USA - 1873

Canyon de Chelly 1873 — more than 130 years later, nature retains her beauty and land looks very nearly the same. Photo #2 by Timothy H. O’Sullivan, War Dept., Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army


Canyon de Chelly, panorama of valley from mountain

Canyon de Chelly, 1941, panorama of valley from mountain. Photo #3 by Ansel Adams; Produced on behalf of the National Park Service

Heaven aka Navajo Nation - Canyon de Chelly

Heaven aka Navajo Nation – Canyon de Chelly. Photo #4 by Wolfgang Staudt

Sunrise at Canyon de Chelly viewpoint Arizona

Sunrise at Canyon de Chelly viewpoint Arizona. The monument covers 131 square miles and encompasses the floors and rims of the three major canyons: de Chelly, del Muerto, and Monument. These canyons were cut by streams with headwaters in the Chuska mountains just to the east of the monument. This collection of images is a tribute to de Chelly and part one of our tribute to the Navajo Nation. Photo #5 by Jono Hey

in Canyon de Chelly

In Canyon de Chelly National Monument which was established in 1931 as a unit of the National Park Service. It is located in northeastern Arizona within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation. It preserves ruins of the early indigenous tribes that lived in the area, including the Ancient Pueblo Peoples, called Anasazi, and Navajo. Photo #6 by Marc Tarlock

Not only are there incredible houses built into gigantic sandstone cliffs, but also features like Spider Rock in a giant split in the canyon

Spider Rock Canyon de Chelly Arizona. Not only are there incredible houses built into gigantic sandstone cliffs, but also features like Spider Rock in a giant split in the canyon. Photo #7 by Jono Hey

Canyon de Chelly is unique among National Park service units, as it consists entirely of Navajo Tribal Trust Land that remains home to the canyon community

Canyon de Chelly is unique among National Park service units, as it consists entirely of Navajo Tribal Trust Land that remains home to the canyon community. Access to the canyon floor is restricted, and visitors are allowed to travel in the canyons only when accompanied by a park ranger or an authorized Navajo guide. There are several well-preserved cliff dwelling sites that were occupied by the ancient peoples who lived in the canyon. Most can only be seen up close if you arrange for one of the jeep tours through the canyon floor. Photo #8 by Michael Seljos

White House ruins in Canyon de Chelly National Monument

White House ruins in Canyon de Chelly National Monument. One of the hiking trails is White House Ruin Trail. It’s 1.25 miles one way and drops down 600 ft. The hike takes approximately 2 hours. Photo #9 by Cacophony

Sunrise and cottonwoods at Canyon de Chelly Arizona

Sunrise and cottonwoods at Canyon de Chelly Arizona. Before the rocks turn red, a line of cottonwoods in the canyon is the only color in the ground. Just above the trees, if you look carefully, you can see the set of houses beneath the giant weeping cliff. Photo #10 by Jono Hey

Canyon de Chelly

Canyon de Chelly sustains a living community of Navajo people, who are connected to a landscape of great historical and spiritual significance. Photo #11 by Wolfgang Staudt

White House Ruin in Canyon de Chelly

White House Ruin in Canyon de Chelly. Photo #12 by RK & Tina

View Canyon de Chelly National Monument

To view, visit Canyon de Chelly National Monument there are several views by driving. North Rim Drive is 18 miles and takes approximately 2 hours. There are 3 overlooks and this drive is best in the morning for photography. South Rim Drive is 16 miles with 7 overlooks. This drive is best for afternoon photography. The drive time is estimated at about 2 hours. Then there are hiking tours, canyon tours and campgrounds. Photo #13 by Gary M. Stolz – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

View East from Spider Rock Overlook

View East from Spider Rock Overlook. Photo #14 by RK & Tina

Navajo dwellings at Canyon de Chelly Arizona

Navajo dwellings at Canyon de Chelly Arizona. Photo #15 by Jono Hey

South Rim at Canyon de Chelly National Monument AZ

South Rim at Canyon de Chelly National Monument AZ. Photo #16 by Paolo Rosa

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona - Antelope House

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona – Antelope House. Photo #17 by Andreas F. Borchert

Some views from the rim of Canyon de Chelly National Monument. Arizona

Some views from the rim of Canyon de Chelly National Monument. Arizona. If you plan to hike, bring your own water and plan to haul out your trash. Like my mom says, it’s important to leave no trail when hiking or hacking. ;-) Seriously, who would want to ruin such beauty by leaving behind their trash? Photo #18 by mark byzewski

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA, View from White House Overlook to northeast. Photo #19 by Greg Peterson of Negaunee, MI

 Reflecting one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America, Canyon de   Chelly sustains a living community of Navajo people, who are connected to a landscape of great   historical and spiritual significance

Reflecting one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America, Canyon de Chelly sustains a living community of Navajo people, who are connected to a landscape of great historical and spiritual significance. Photo #20 by Jim Lawrence

Rock art panel near the entrance to the canyon

Rock art panel near the entrance to the canyon or Tseyi’. Photo #21 by National Park Service

White House Ruins, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, AZ

White House Ruins, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, AZ. Ancient Anasazi ruins in Canyon de Chelly National Monument. Note the large petroglyph on the cliff below and to the right of the two white towers. Photo #22 by Les Kopel

Looking into Arizona's Canyon de Chelly

Looking into Arizona’s Canyon de Chelly. Photo #23 by Greg Peterson of Negaunee, MI

Deep Twilight - Canyon del Muerto at dusk, Canyon de Chelly National MONUMENT

Deep Twilight – Canyon del Muerto at dusk, Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona. Photo #24 by RK & Tina

Canyon de Chelly Petroglyphs - People on Horseback

Canyon de Chelly Petroglyphs – People on Horseback. There are nearly countless pictographs which are painting on the rocks and petroglyphs with are pecking on the rocks at Canyon de Chelly. This ancient rock art goes back thousands of years to record the history and culture here. Photo #25 by Andreas F. Borchert

Spider Rock in Canyon de Chelly National Monument

Spider Rock in Canyon de Chelly National Monument. Photo #26 by Cacophony

Navajo dwellings at Canyon de Chelly Arizona

Navajo dwellings at Canyon de Chelly Arizona. The Ancient Puebloans found the canyons an ideal place to plant crops and raise families. The first settlers built pit houses that were then replaced with more sophisticated homes as more families migrated to the area. More homes were built in alcoves to take advantage of the sunlight and natural protection. People thrived until the mid-1300′s when the Puebloans left the canyons to seek better farmlands. Photo #27 by Jono Hey

view of Petroglyph Rock area at Canyon de Chelly

Canyon de Chelly National Monument – view of Petroglyph Rock. Photo #28 by National Park Service

White House Ruins in Canyon de Chelly near Chinle, Arizona were built about 1200 by the Anasazi, a Navajo word meaning the Ancient One

White House Ruins in Canyon de Chelly near Chinle, Arizona were built about 1200 by the Anasazi, a Navajo word meaning the Ancient One. Descendants of the Puebloans, the Hopi migrated into the canyons to plant fields of corn and orchards of peaches. The Hopi permanently settled on the mesa tops. The Navajo settled the Southwest between the four sacred mountains. The Navajo, or Dine’ as they call themselves, continue to raise families and plant crops just as the “Ancient Ones” had. The farms, livestock and hogans of the Dine’ are visible from the canyon rims. Photo #29 by Greg Peterson of Negaunee, MI

Cottonwood Canyon

Cottonwood Canyon – Canyon de Chelly Monument. Photo #30 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly Ledge Ruin Close View

Close view of the ledge and ruins at Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona. Another hiking trail is Three Turkey Ruins where most of the original structure is still intact. It gets its name by the rock art of three turkeys visible on the upper room wall – slightly to the left of the door. Photo #31 by Andreas F. Borchert

view from the head of Cotton wood canyon at Canyon de Chelly Monument

Canyon de Chelly National Monument – view from the head of Cotton wood canyon. Photo #32 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. Rock art panel near Antelope House, showing pronghorn and other animals

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. Rock art panel near Antelope House, showing pronghorn and other animals. Photo #33 by National Park Service

Spider Rock and Face Rock

Spider Rock (left) and Face Rock (right). Photo #34 by National Park Service

80-yr-old grandma overlooking Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona

80-yr-old grandma overlooking Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona. Photo #35 by Michael Seljos

Spider Rock, about 250 meters high. Canyon de Chelly

Spider Rock, about 250 meters high. Canyon de Chelly is one of the longest continuously inhabited landscapes of North America, located nearby the Navajo village of Chinle in Arizona. Photo #36 by vtveen

Tunnel Canyon at Canyon de Chelly

Tunnel Canyon at Canyon de Chelly. Photo #37 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly National Monument -- Landscape

Canyon de Chelly National Monument — Landscape, view of Sliding House area. Photo #38 by National Park Service

Mummy Cave Landscape - Canyon de Chelly National Monument

Look at the middle of this photo and then slightly right. In the shadows, you can just make out dwellings in the cliff walls. This is a Mummy Cave Landscape – Canyon de Chelly National Monument. Photo #39 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly - view from Tsegi overlook

Canyon de Chelly – view from Tsegi overlook. Photo #40 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. Rock art panel near Antelope House

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. Rock art panel near Antelope House. Photo #41 by National Park Service

horses drinking from the wash in Canyon de Chelly

Horses drinking from the wash in Canyon de Chelly. Photo #42 by Sharon Sperry Bloom

canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. White House Ruin

Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona – White House Ruins. Photo #43 by National Park Service

Canyon de Chelly First Ruin - First ruin, i.e. westmost ruin within the canyon

Canyon de Chelly First Ruin – First ruin, i.e. westmost ruin within the canyon. Photo #44 by Andreas F. Borchert

Canyon de Chelly Junction Ruin

Canyon de Chelly Junction Ruin. Did you know that the Navajo Parks and Recreation Department is one of the oldest programs in the Navajo Nation government? It was established in 1964 and is charged with the responsibility to the the Navajo Nation’s primary caretaker of special lands set aside for preservation. It’s mission is to wisely manage Navajo parks, monuments and recreation areas for the long-term benefit of the Navajo people and government. The Navajo Nation is comprised of essentially private lands, therefore all non-Navajo visitors must abide by and comply with the laws, regulations and policies promulgated by the Navajo Nation government, including those governing Navajo parks, monuments and recreation areas. Photo #45 by Andreas F. Borchert

Canyon de Chelly National Monument waterfalling

Water falling and cliff dwelling at Canyon de Chelly. Photo #46 by National Park Service

View near Beehive Cave

View near Beehive Cave. Photo #47 by National Park Service

Petroglyphs - Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA

Petroglyphs – Canyon de Chelly National Monument, Arizona, USA. Photo #48 by National Park Service

USA, Arizona, Canyon De Chelly, SpiderRock

USA, Arizona, Canyon De Chelly, SpiderRock. Photo #49 by www.Gernot-Keller.com

Canyon de Chelly National Park - view of canyon mouth

Canyon de Chelly National Park – view of canyon mouth. Photo #50 by National Park Service


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